N18°18′38″   W65°47′29″
N18°18′38″ W65°47′29″

At 3,540 feet above sea level, Pico El Yunque is one of the highest points on the island of Puerto Rico. Located within the Sierra de Luquillo mountains, El Yunque Peak sits in the center of El Yunque National Forest. This is the only tropical rainforest of the United States National Forest System. 

Land of the Windmills
Land of the Windmills

View of a common home in the barrio of Cayures. Wind Farms make up much of the barrio Cayures, in Santa Isabel. These wind farms are the largest on the island, containing 44 turbines that help produce over 100 megawatts of clean energy for the island. 

Young Man and Gamecock
Young Man and Gamecock

A young man sits and grooms his rooster before his first fight a few days away in Villalba, Puerto Rico. A lot of grooming is done to the gamecocks because many trainers believe the removal of excess feathers, the wattles, and the comb help give mobility to the gamecocks during the fight.

Gamecocks in Villalba
Gamecocks in Villalba

Gamecocks are normally kept in their own separate pens, to protect them from attacking each other. Due to being aggressive to the same sex of the species by nature, if left to roam free amongst each other the roosters could be injured. 

My Fathers Stomping Grounds
My Fathers Stomping Grounds

Fresh plantains are placed in the shade to ripen in my Grandparents home in the barrio Dajao, Villalba. 

Portrait of a Jíbaro Home
Portrait of a Jíbaro Home

Built in 1895 by my Great-Great Grand Father José Balbino Negron. The home is made entirely of wood with a roof made of aluminum panels, and raised 3 feet from the ground. Many of the walls are unable to bare weight and are supported by the many beams that are visible throughout the interior. The doors and windows are kept open throughout the day to help bring cool air from the forest into the rooms. The toilet is kept in an outhouse a good distance away from the home. 

Relatives of Jagüeyes
Relatives of Jagüeyes

My Great-Grandaunt Toñi Camacho and Great-Granduncle Braulio Rivera stand outside their home during the late evening hours in the barrio of Jagüeyes, Villalba.

Lago Toa Vaca
Lago Toa Vaca

View of the reservoir Lago Toa Vaca and the municipalty Villalba from Route 5514. 

Children of Jagüeyes
Children of Jagüeyes

Local children of the barrio Jagüeyes in the municipality of Villalba, stop play to show their bikes. 

Where The 39 Homes End
Where The 39 Homes End

Locals relax in the high noon heat, outside a market at the end of Ponce's historical Calle 25 De Enero. The street is known for its 39 red and black painted homes that house the descendents of the firefighters that battled the El Polvorín or Powder - a great fire which took place in the city in 1899.

La Cantera, Ponce
La Cantera, Ponce

View of the sidewalk on Calle 4 in La Cantera. La Cantera is one of the major urban barrios of the city Ponce. 

Old Gates, New Days
Old Gates, New Days

An old entrance way to the homes of El Semil, in Villalba Puerto Rico.

Old Stomping Grounds of A Younger Self
Old Stomping Grounds of A Younger Self

The landscape of my grandparents home is where I spent many hours of my youth chasing my grandfathers chickens and roosters. The farm sits in the deep valley of the barrio Dajao, in Villalba Puerto Rico.

Fowls of the Deep Valley
Fowls of the Deep Valley

Young cousins take on the tradition of raising and training gamecocks. By grabbing the legs, it prevents any injury from the sharp spurs this mature gamecock posseses. 

N18°18′38″   W65°47′29″
N18°18′38″ W65°47′29″

View from the top of Pico El Yunque, in El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico.

Riding on Route 149
Riding on Route 149

A majority Puerto Rico's roads and towns are populated by sato's. Sato's are mixed breed dogs that roam much of the island. Many sato's become victims of hit and runs with automobiles and are left on the side of the road awaiting removal by the town. The growing number of these stray dogs is due to economic and cultural factors within the island. Organizations have begun with a mission to help find these animals homes. The sato's have begun to find homes in the United States. 

La Cantera, Ponce
La Cantera, Ponce

Much of the La Cantera is backdropped by the Rio Portugués. Rio Portugués is the major river that runs along much of the city and helped give birth to Ponce. 

Portrait of a Grandfather
Portrait of a Grandfather

My Grandfather Horacio Alvarado sits under his hand-built awning in order to escape the strong afternoon sun on his property which he built in 1971. 

Sato's of El Semil
Sato's of El Semil

A mixed breed dog takes shelter from the heat in Villalba, Puerto Rico. 

Artifacts of an Old Puerto Rico
Artifacts of an Old Puerto Rico

An old sink along with a concrete washboard was the way my great grandmother would wash the families clothing. With much of her time taken up with raising and feeding the family, she spent one day a week doing the laundry. As modern appliances became more accessible to every part of the island, she eventually purchased a modern washing unit to help with the time consuming task.

Children of Dajao
Children of Dajao

A young boy captures a rooster from the brush that makes up most of the barrio called Dajao. The neighborhood is part of the municipality of Villalba, Puerto Rico.

Gamecocks in Villalba
Gamecocks in Villalba

Trainers tie "boxing gloves" to the gamecocks spurs to prevent any physical injury from occurring when sparing with other gamecocks. 

Gamecocks in Villalba
Gamecocks in Villalba

Cockfighting is an age long tradition in Puerto Rico, with many Puerto Rican's taking part in the sport. The gamecocks are pampered and well taken care of until two years of age. Many trainers, prepare them to be sold off to potential buyers for use in the cockfighting clubs on the island.

Jíbaro
Jíbaro

View of my Great-Grandparents bedroom in the home built by my Great-Great-Grandfather José Balbino Negron in the 1800's. The home was handed down to his son, my Great-Grandfather Emilio Rivera Negron and would be the home of my Grandmother. Later on my Mother would spend her childhood here as well. The home still stands today and is occupied by one of the many grandchildren of the family.

On Puerto Rico's Route 1
On Puerto Rico's Route 1

On the side of many major roadways in Puerto Rico, sit abandoned markets and homes of earlier times. Many have fallen due to the poor economy and lack of business.

Dia De La Candelaria
Dia De La Candelaria

Near the end of January and begining of February, Puerto Rican's across the island celebrate their official end to the Christmas holiday with candles, giant bonfires, and singing. Smoke from the bonfires engulf many of the roads on the island.

N18°18′38″   W65°47′29″
Land of the Windmills
Young Man and Gamecock
Gamecocks in Villalba
My Fathers Stomping Grounds
Portrait of a Jíbaro Home
Relatives of Jagüeyes
Lago Toa Vaca
Children of Jagüeyes
Where The 39 Homes End
La Cantera, Ponce
Old Gates, New Days
Old Stomping Grounds of A Younger Self
Fowls of the Deep Valley
N18°18′38″   W65°47′29″
Riding on Route 149
La Cantera, Ponce
Portrait of a Grandfather
Sato's of El Semil
Artifacts of an Old Puerto Rico
Children of Dajao
Gamecocks in Villalba
Gamecocks in Villalba
Jíbaro
On Puerto Rico's Route 1
Dia De La Candelaria
N18°18′38″ W65°47′29″

At 3,540 feet above sea level, Pico El Yunque is one of the highest points on the island of Puerto Rico. Located within the Sierra de Luquillo mountains, El Yunque Peak sits in the center of El Yunque National Forest. This is the only tropical rainforest of the United States National Forest System. 

Land of the Windmills

View of a common home in the barrio of Cayures. Wind Farms make up much of the barrio Cayures, in Santa Isabel. These wind farms are the largest on the island, containing 44 turbines that help produce over 100 megawatts of clean energy for the island. 

Young Man and Gamecock

A young man sits and grooms his rooster before his first fight a few days away in Villalba, Puerto Rico. A lot of grooming is done to the gamecocks because many trainers believe the removal of excess feathers, the wattles, and the comb help give mobility to the gamecocks during the fight.

Gamecocks in Villalba

Gamecocks are normally kept in their own separate pens, to protect them from attacking each other. Due to being aggressive to the same sex of the species by nature, if left to roam free amongst each other the roosters could be injured. 

My Fathers Stomping Grounds

Fresh plantains are placed in the shade to ripen in my Grandparents home in the barrio Dajao, Villalba. 

Portrait of a Jíbaro Home

Built in 1895 by my Great-Great Grand Father José Balbino Negron. The home is made entirely of wood with a roof made of aluminum panels, and raised 3 feet from the ground. Many of the walls are unable to bare weight and are supported by the many beams that are visible throughout the interior. The doors and windows are kept open throughout the day to help bring cool air from the forest into the rooms. The toilet is kept in an outhouse a good distance away from the home. 

Relatives of Jagüeyes

My Great-Grandaunt Toñi Camacho and Great-Granduncle Braulio Rivera stand outside their home during the late evening hours in the barrio of Jagüeyes, Villalba.

Lago Toa Vaca

View of the reservoir Lago Toa Vaca and the municipalty Villalba from Route 5514. 

Children of Jagüeyes

Local children of the barrio Jagüeyes in the municipality of Villalba, stop play to show their bikes. 

Where The 39 Homes End

Locals relax in the high noon heat, outside a market at the end of Ponce's historical Calle 25 De Enero. The street is known for its 39 red and black painted homes that house the descendents of the firefighters that battled the El Polvorín or Powder - a great fire which took place in the city in 1899.

La Cantera, Ponce

View of the sidewalk on Calle 4 in La Cantera. La Cantera is one of the major urban barrios of the city Ponce. 

Old Gates, New Days

An old entrance way to the homes of El Semil, in Villalba Puerto Rico.

Old Stomping Grounds of A Younger Self

The landscape of my grandparents home is where I spent many hours of my youth chasing my grandfathers chickens and roosters. The farm sits in the deep valley of the barrio Dajao, in Villalba Puerto Rico.

Fowls of the Deep Valley

Young cousins take on the tradition of raising and training gamecocks. By grabbing the legs, it prevents any injury from the sharp spurs this mature gamecock posseses. 

N18°18′38″ W65°47′29″

View from the top of Pico El Yunque, in El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico.

Riding on Route 149

A majority Puerto Rico's roads and towns are populated by sato's. Sato's are mixed breed dogs that roam much of the island. Many sato's become victims of hit and runs with automobiles and are left on the side of the road awaiting removal by the town. The growing number of these stray dogs is due to economic and cultural factors within the island. Organizations have begun with a mission to help find these animals homes. The sato's have begun to find homes in the United States. 

La Cantera, Ponce

Much of the La Cantera is backdropped by the Rio Portugués. Rio Portugués is the major river that runs along much of the city and helped give birth to Ponce. 

Portrait of a Grandfather

My Grandfather Horacio Alvarado sits under his hand-built awning in order to escape the strong afternoon sun on his property which he built in 1971. 

Sato's of El Semil

A mixed breed dog takes shelter from the heat in Villalba, Puerto Rico. 

Artifacts of an Old Puerto Rico

An old sink along with a concrete washboard was the way my great grandmother would wash the families clothing. With much of her time taken up with raising and feeding the family, she spent one day a week doing the laundry. As modern appliances became more accessible to every part of the island, she eventually purchased a modern washing unit to help with the time consuming task.

Children of Dajao

A young boy captures a rooster from the brush that makes up most of the barrio called Dajao. The neighborhood is part of the municipality of Villalba, Puerto Rico.

Gamecocks in Villalba

Trainers tie "boxing gloves" to the gamecocks spurs to prevent any physical injury from occurring when sparing with other gamecocks. 

Gamecocks in Villalba

Cockfighting is an age long tradition in Puerto Rico, with many Puerto Rican's taking part in the sport. The gamecocks are pampered and well taken care of until two years of age. Many trainers, prepare them to be sold off to potential buyers for use in the cockfighting clubs on the island.

Jíbaro

View of my Great-Grandparents bedroom in the home built by my Great-Great-Grandfather José Balbino Negron in the 1800's. The home was handed down to his son, my Great-Grandfather Emilio Rivera Negron and would be the home of my Grandmother. Later on my Mother would spend her childhood here as well. The home still stands today and is occupied by one of the many grandchildren of the family.

On Puerto Rico's Route 1

On the side of many major roadways in Puerto Rico, sit abandoned markets and homes of earlier times. Many have fallen due to the poor economy and lack of business.

Dia De La Candelaria

Near the end of January and begining of February, Puerto Rican's across the island celebrate their official end to the Christmas holiday with candles, giant bonfires, and singing. Smoke from the bonfires engulf many of the roads on the island.

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